dr. spainhower

by jp omega

can u tell to me what is my problem in my jaw. couple days ago i pushed something in my jaw then it has a sound then i started move side to side it has popping and i cannot eat properly now and something ringing in my ears i cant take it anymore .

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Nov 03, 2013
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Echoing
by: Marissa

Does TMJ have to do with echoing when talking?

Nov 03, 2013
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Echoing
by: Marissa

Does TMJ have to do with echoing when talking?

Feb 17, 2012
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Eating and pain in the neck.
by: Dr. Spainhower

Hi Nick,

To answer your last two questions...

Yes, eating and avoiding the popping does help reduce further damage in the capusule/disc. Noticed that I said..."reduce", because when you have clicking and popping, you will most likely see a worsening or more destruction of the disc in the joint through the years.

So, whether you wear a splint at night or not, you will still have breakdown of the tissues.

Wearing a splint or night guard will reduce the breakdown more than Not wearing one. So, it will be better to wear a night guard to slow down the deterioration in the joint.

Sincerely,

Dr. Spainhower

Feb 16, 2012
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PAIN IN SHOULDERS AND NECK
by: NICK

Could my TMJ actually refer pain and weakness down into my neck and shoulders. Clicking in the left fossa and shoulder & neck pain and fatigue in the right shoulder. i am a mess.

Feb 15, 2012
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Wearing a splint
by: Anonymous

Thanks for your response. Would eating soft food and trying to avoid the popping result in this condition staying in its mildest form? Would a splint do any long term good in and of itself. It seems more like a diagnostic device.

Feb 14, 2012
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long term affects
by: Dr. Spainhower

Hello Nick,

To answer your question...In any event what do you feel the long term effects of the dislocated capsule?.

You can have osteo degenerative arthritis, which is not systemic. You'll have a break down of the tissues. The disc gets squished and flattened to a point where it doesn't perform like God designed it to perform. The disc will perforate sometimes, and the result is often in the later years, a bone on bone situation.

Then the bony condyle will or can have degenerative arthritis. This is however pretty common with the majority of the population as the condyle remodels to adapt to the forces and pressures in the TMJ's.

The biggest annoyance is the disc being dislocated or slipping in and out of place which causes popping and clicking and lock jaw.

So, yes, you are right about getting arthritis when the disc is dislocating, but the focus is how to reduce the symptoms felt by the slipping disc.

Sincerely,

Dr. Spainhower

Feb 13, 2012
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Lifelong Problem
by: Nick

Interesting that your note to JP Omega remarks that the clicking and popping due to dislocation is likely to be a lifelng issue. Would this not result in Arthitus/ I have the same issue and try not to cause the popping but chewing a sandwich is impossible to not cuse that. In any event what do you feel the long term effects of the dislocated capsule. I notice after much looking into that no one has a remedy for this if its an actual dislocation.

Feb 12, 2012
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irritating sounds in your ears
by: Dr. Spainhower

Hello Jp,

Clenching your teeth together can cause ringing in your ears. So, if you reduce your clenching, the ringing in the ears will reduce.

However, there are many other causes of ringing in the ears. If the a night guard does not stop ringing in the ears, you'll need to see a physician to properly diagnose your situation.

You could be hearing the disc grating and grinding in the ear which would require the same treatment that I've discussed earlier.

So, if a night guard does not reduce your symptoms within days or a week or two, you need to see a physician.

Sincerely,

Dr. Spainhower

Feb 12, 2012
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dr.spainhower
by: jp omega

i will talk about that when my mom is here.how about the irritating sounds in my ear its killing me :(

Feb 12, 2012
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Pop near your ears
by: Dr. Spainhower

Hello again JP,

The popping is most likely a dislocating disc in your TMJ. If that is true, you will always have the disc slipping in and out of place.

Don't worry too much about it though, as you should be fine through life, but with occasional annoyances with popping.

The most difficult issue you'll most likely have is jaw locking. It isn't life threatening, but is very uncomfortable.

You'll want to wear a night guard at night to reduce the popping and possible jaw locking symptoms.

Purchase the "SmartGuard Elite night guard" first to see if that helps you. I can help you through the process if you contact me through my email at tmj spainhower at g mail dot com.

Sincerely,

Dr. Spainhower

Feb 12, 2012
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thank u so much to your respond.
by: jp omega

do u think i dont have other problem i want to make sure before i'll go in the doctor i dont want to spend money. you know when i open my mouth is pretty tight sometime it has pop near in my ear .im really scared about this and my ears in freaking me out i hate the sounds. and im only 16 :(

Feb 12, 2012
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Popping and can't eat
by: Dr. Spainhower

Hello JP,

With the little information, I may not give an accurate assessment, however, your symptoms are consistent to clenching too much.

Don't allow your teeth to touch during the day. Exercise enough to sweat at least 3 times per week. Remember to keep your teeth apart at all times. Get enough sleep and eat healthy foods.

Don't drink caffeinated products or Diet/low fat foods that have artificial sweetners in them.


And, it can be helpful to wear a night guard at night designed to reduce clenching.

Sincerely,

Dr. Spainhower

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